Chamomile Tea: What it is, Health Benefits, and Uses


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Keyword: Chamomile

Chamomile tea is a popular herbal tea, and has been used as an alternative medicine for centuries. Chamomile can be consumed in many different ways: either steeped in hot water or iced, drunk as a cold drink like lemonade, mixed with honey and lemon juice to make a chamomile syrup that can be taken by the spoonful (especially helpful for kids!), or even added to your bathwater! Chamomile is known for its calming properties and is often recommended as part of a sleep regimen.

Health Benefits

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Chamomile has also been shown to have health benefits such as reducing stress levels, treating insomnia, helping with allergies and asthma symptoms, easing menstrual cramps and bloating, lowering cholesterol levels; it may also help treat gastrointestinal and urinary tract disorders.

Chamomile tea is made from the dried flower heads and may be slightly sweet and apple-scented. Chamomile tea’s health benefits come largely from its high content of polyphenols, antioxidants that protect cells in the body against damage from free radicals, which are molecules produced during the breakdown of oxygen that can cause cell and tissue damage.

Chamomile has been found to contain more polyphenols than any other plant commonly consumed as a tea, and these substances may account for chamomile’s anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-ulcer properties. Chamomile tea is often recommended as an alternative sleep aid. Chamomile contains Chamazulene, which has anti-inflammatory properties.

Chamomile is also known for its calming effects. Chamomile’s sedative effects may be due to flavonoids or terpenes in the plant which are believed to inhibit the action of certain neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. Chamomile is usually consumed as a hot water extract because it can help relieve symptoms associated with irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, inflammatory skin diseases, headaches and migraines. Chamomile is also used topically for skin conditions such as eczema, acne, psoriasis, chicken pox rashes and insect bites.

Soothing Chamomile Tea Recipe

3 cups Chamomile

3 Chamomile tea bags

1 tablespoon Chamomile flowers

Bring 3 cups of water to a boil.

Once the water is boiling, add Chamomile and Chamomile tea bags. Let it steep for five minutes before removing Chamomile tea bags. Stir in Chamomile flowers and let the Chamomile tea sit for another 10 minutes or so to allow Chamomilie’s flavor to infuse into the Chamomile tea.

Strain out Chamomilie from your Chamomilie tea, and serve with either honey or lemon as you like (optional). Enjoy!

Chamomile tea has been consumed for centuries as a means of promoting health and well-being. Chamomile tea is made from the dried flower heads and contains high levels of polyphenols, antioxidants that protect cells in the body against damage from free radicals. Chamomile tea is often recommended as an alternative sleep aid and may also help relieve symptoms associated with irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, inflammatory skin diseases, headaches and migraines. Chamomile tea can be enjoyed hot or cold, depending on your preference, and can be sweetened with honey or lemon juice. Thanks for reading!

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